O’Reilly Theater
April 21 — May 22
8 p.m., 2 p.m., 7 p.m.

He authored iconic works of modern literature such as Breakfast at Tiffany’s and In Cold Blood, was powerfully portrayed in an Academy Award-wining biopic film performance by the late actor Philip Seymour Hoffman, and he is known for his strong bonds with famed socialites and writers such as Gloria Vanderbilt and Harper Lee.

Eddie Korbich. Photo courtesy Pittsburgh Public Theater.

Eddie Korbich. Photo courtesy Pittsburgh Public Theater.

Now, a pivotal period in the life of celebrated American novelist, screenwriter, playwright and actor Truman Capote will come to life on stage in Pittsburgh Public Theater‘s latest production. Written by pioneering novelist, playwright, screenwriter and producer Jay Presson Allen, TRU opens on Thursday, April 21 for a month-long run at downtown’s O’Reilly Theater.

TRU takes audiences to Capote’s New York City apartment during the year 1975. A chapter from his new book Answered Prayers has just been published in Esquire, and it’s described as being “dropped like a bomb on New York society.” In the unfinished novel—published posthumously in 1987—Capote “dished the dirt about the rich and powerful in his circle, salaciously naming names and telling all.”

As Allen’s story unfolds, Capote shares “the revelations of this reckless genius”—employing his signature wit and frankness to share stories about his unconventional childhood, celeb confidantes, deepest, darkest secrets, and how he arrived at this difficult crossroads.

Directed by PPT’s own Ted Pappas, the riveting one-man play “catches brilliant writer Truman Capote at his turning point.” Née Truman Streckfus Persons in 1924 in storied New Orleans, Capote rocketed to fame shortly after publishing his first novel, Other Voices, Other Rooms, in 1948 at age 23. Starring as the the inimitable Capote is actor, singer and dancer Eddie Korbich, who grew up in Shamokin, PA. Korbich—who has appeared in numerous Broadway productions—is making his PPT debut in TRU.

Ahead of her time as one of very few women who made a living as a screenwriter—Jay Presson Allen (1922 – 1966) is acclaimed for writing the screenplay for Alfred Hitchcock’s film, Marnie, the adaptation of Muriel Spark’s novel, The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, as well as additional screenplays such as Funny Lady, Deathtrap and Just Tell Me What You Want.

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