Graffiti. Wheatpastes. Stencils. Murals. Once renegade and considered urban blight, street art is now a cultural movement showcased in sold-out museum exhibitions and co-opted by brands from Adidas to Dolce & Gabbana.

We’re not talking about the aimless tagging that litters public and private spaces. Think instead of the more famous urban street artists, from Banksy and Basquiat, to Blek Le Rat and Espo.

Or locally think of Tim Kaulen, one of the most recognized street artists-turned-legit. His works–the iconic Deerhead at Carrie Furnaces and his classic Amaco Bulls–were among the first urban art fixtures in the city. Today, his commissioned work appears throughout the city, including  The Workers, a 20-foot sculpture honoring Pittsburgh’s heritage located along the South Side riverfront.

John Rodella rides by The Workers by Tim Kaulen. Photo by Tracy Certo.

The Workers, by Tim Kaulen. Photo by Tracy Certo.

Our city’s architecture provides a rich canvas for artists—both authorized and transient. And there are some areas where the art is  so concentrated that it’s like walking through an outdoor gallery.

We spoke with Shannon of PGH Murals, street artists Jeremy Raymer and Shane Pilster and visited many neighborhoods with great street art. Here are some of the best places we’ve found and a good start to your Pittsburgh street art tour.

At the Carrie Furnace. Photo by Shane Pilster.

NSF Crew graf at the Carrie Furnace. Photo by Shane Pilster.

1. Carrie Furnace

In 2012, Shane Pilster, a San Francisco Bay native who moved to Pittsburgh over a decade ago, took a tour of the Carrie Furnace.  Pilster, who has been painting graffiti, marveled at the rich “collection” in the historic site—pieces by artists like Hert, Prism, Mfone, Necksi, Onorok, and 21Rak, to name a few. He convinced Ron Baraff, who directs the furnace’s archives, not only to preserve a few of the works but also to designate a couple of spaces for street artists to produce new ones.

Local artist Ryan Keene did this for the Alloy Pittsburgh show in 2013. Photo by Tracy Certo.

Ryan Keene for the Alloy Pittsburgh Show 2013 at the Carrie Furnace. Photo by Tracy Certo.

In these new walls, Pilster and artists like Kaff-eine have created work that is a sight to behold. Pilster holds Urban Art Tours and Workshops at the Carrie Furnace, a great immersive experience to get a broader understanding of street art’s culture and wide-ranging style.

Art by Kaff-eine. Photo by Jeremy Raymer.

Art by Kaff-eine. Photo by Jeremy Raymer.

Art by Matt Gondek. Photo by Jeremy Raymer

Art by Matt Gondek. Photo by Jeremy Raymer

2. Lawrenceville

Of course, uber-hip Lawrenceville makes the list. Start at Doughboy Square to check out Kaff-eine’s work on a boarded-up building.  It reflects the street artist ethos, says street artist Jeremy Raymer. “Note how she preserved a Shepard Fairey ‘Obey’ wheat paste by incorporating it in the creature standing.” Raymer’s work, both commissioned and otherwise, can be seen around the city, including the street art gallery on the walls of houses on 35th St. and 42nd St.  Don’t miss the“Exploding Homer” by Matt Gondek on Dresden Way between 54th and 55th St. PGH Murals lists 23 works in this area alone.

Art by Swoon. Photo by PGH Murals.

Art by Swoon. Photo by PGH Murals.

3. Braddock and North Braddock

With 33 works listed on PGH Murals, a street art tour is just one more reason to check out Braddock. Works by James Simon, Anthony Purcell, Kaff-eine, Swoon, and the 30 artists collective enliven the one square-mile town. Make sure you veer off Braddock Ave. to check out Lady Pink’s Brick Woman under the bridge on Library St. along with Maya Hayuk’s pattern on 809 Talbot Ave., and portraits of local residents by Swoon under the railroad on 505 Verona St.

Since you’re in the area, head over to North Braddock for a short stop. Street art royalty Swoon and the Transformazium art collective have taken over an old church in North Braddock to launch the Braddock Tiles project.  You can see some of her work outside the church, on 798 Hawkins Ave. including a super adobe structure at 714 Jones Ave.

4. The East Busway

At 5880 Centre Avenue on the Busway is one of the most detailed murals in the East End (see top photo).  “This mural is only visible from the busway or from Tay Way or College Ave where it wraps behind the Tokyo Japanese Food Market off Ellsworth Ave in Shadyside. It’s worth the effort to find a vantage point to see it,” notes PGH Murals. Multiple artists contributed to the work but Ashley Hodder’s Mother Nature image on the left is especially noteworthy for its breathtaking detail. Bring binoculars or a telephoto lens to catch every element that makes up this beautiful work.