You might have to go cold turkey this Thanksgiving Eve.

As part of new targeted mitigation measures to help stop the spread of Covid, Gov. Tom Wolf announced today that bars, restaurants and private catered events must end alcohol sales for on-site consumption at 5 p.m. on Nov. 25, traditionally one of the biggest party nights of the year. The order will end at 8 a.m. on Nov. 26.

The administration is encouraging Pennsylvanians to limit unnecessary travel and stay at home for the holiday. It also prohibited events with more than 500 people indoors and more than 2,500 outdoors.

In a press release, Wolf and Secretary of Health Dr. Rachel Levine said the mandates were brought forth from modeling that projects that December could bring 22,000 new COVID-19 cases per day in Pennsylvania.

On Monday, there were 4,762 new confirmed Covid cases across the Commonwealth, on top of 7,075 new cases reported Sunday. The statewide total is 314,401 cases, with 3,379 hospitalized patients.

“As our hospitals and health care system are facing greater strain, we need to redouble our efforts to keep people safe,” Wolf said. “If our health care system is compromised, it isn’t only COVID-19 patients who will suffer. If we run out of hospital beds, or if hospital staff are overworked to the breaking point, care will suffer for every patient — including those who need emergency care for illnesses, accidents or chronic conditions unrelated to COVID-19.”

Wolf is ramping up enforcement of Covid orders, including mandated mask-wearing, restricted gathering limits and requiring anyone who visits from another state to have a negative Covid test within 72 hours prior to entering Pennsylvania. Persons who fail to comply with an order may be fined between $25 and $300.

Enforcement agencies include the Pennsylvania State Police, local law enforcement, personnel from the departments of Agriculture and State and PA Liquor Control Board stores who interact with visitors.

“As the Secretary of Health, I have issued a series of advisories and orders intended to help stop the spread during this critical time, to protect our hospitals, our health care workers and the lives of our fellow Pennsylvanians,” Levine said. “Our collective responsibility continues to be to protect our communities, our health care workers and our most vulnerable Pennsylvanians from COVID-19. That has not changed.”